© 2023 by The Boston Public Health Commission.

    The discussion guide is an accompanying tool that allows workshop facilitators, teens or adults, to foster conversation with viewers about the themes in the web series. The guide is broken down by episode and provides tips to anticipate challenges to the messages in the film. The guide covers gender norms, homophobia, healthy conflict resolution, consent, deconstructing victim blaming and more.  We hope you find it useful when viewing The Halls.

    If you have questions please email Jess Alder at jalder@bphc.org or 617-534-3446. Also we would love to hear from those who are using the guide and viewing The Halls so please reach out and let us know. In solidarity to end gender-based violence.

STATISTICS and RESOURCES

Healthy vs. unhealthy relationships; warning signs of an unhealthy relationship; 5 types of abuse

(Episodes: 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)

 

Statistics

 

  • Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

(National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Understanding Teen Dating Violence fact sheet. 2016.)

 

  • Among MA high school students who have dated:

    • 24.3% report having experienced controlling behaviors on the part of a dating partner or someone they were going out with.

    • 10% report having been hurt physically by a date or someone they were going out with.

    • The experience of ever having been physically hurt by a date is more common for:

      • Female students than male students (13.8% vs. 6.3%)

      • Gay, lesbian and bisexual students than heterosexual students (29.8% vs. 8.4%)

      • Hispanic students than White students (13.0% vs. 9.4%)

      • Students with disabilities than students without disabilities (18.3% vs. 6.4%)

(MA Department of Public Health Office of Data Management and Outcomes Assessment, Health Survey Program. 2015 MA Youth Health Survey data.)

  • Nationally, among high school students who dated, 21% of females and 10% of males experienced physical and/or sexual violence.

(Vagi KJ, Olsen EOM, et al. Teen Dating Violence (Physical and Sexual) Among U.S. High School Students: Findings from the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. JAMA Pediatrics. 169 (5). 2015.)

 

  • More than half of women (69.5%) and men (53.6%) who have been physically or sexually abused, or stalked by a dating partner, first experienced some form of partner abuse between 11 and 17 years of age.

(Breiding MJ, Chen J, and Black MC. Intimate Partner in the United States - 2010. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Resources

 

  • Casa Myrna’s SafeLink hotline in Massachusetts (24/7)

(877) 875-2020

(800) 841-8371

  • Love Is Respect national teen dating violence hotline (24/7) and chat line

(866) 331-9474 or text “loveis” to 22522

 

 

Gender identity

(Episodes: 2, 3)

Statistics

 

  • Among MA high school students who have dated, the experience of ever having been physically hurt by a date is more common for GLBT students than heterosexual students (29.8% vs. 8.4%).

(MA Department of Public Health Office of Data Management and Outcomes Assessment, Health Survey Program. 2015 MA Youth Health Survey data.)

 

  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) youth are more likely to experience physical and psychological dating abuse, sexual coercion, and cyber dating abuse than their heterosexual peers.

(Dank M, Lachman P, et al. Dating Violence Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 43 (5). 2014.)

 

  • 44% of lesbian women and 61% of bisexual women, compared to 35% of heterosexual women, experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. And 26% of gay men and 37% of bisexual men experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime.

(National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2010 report.)

Resources

 

  • BAGLY (Boston Alliance of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer Youth) and its GLBT Youth Group Network of Massachusetts

​(617) 227-4313

(800) 832-1901

(617) 267-0900

(877) 565-8860

(866) 488-7386, chat and text line available

Social media's influence on relationships; online boundaries

(Episodes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7)

Statistics

 

  • Teens believe that dating abuse via technology via email, text, IM, phone, and social media is a serious problem. Of teens who have been in a relationship:

    • One in three (30%) say they’ve been text messaged 10, 20, or 30 times an hour by a partner to find out where they are, what they’re doing, and who they’re with.

    • One in four (25%) say they have been called names, harassed, or put down by their partner though cell and text. One in ten (10%) report they have been threatened physically through cell, text, or IM.

    • One in five (19%) say their partner has used a cell or social media to spread rumors about them. And more than one in ten (11%) report a partner has shared private or embarrassing pictures/videos of them.

    • 17% say their partner has made them afraid not to respond to a call, email, text, or IM because of what they might do.

       (Fifth & Pacific Companies (formerly Liz Claiborne Inc.) and TRU. Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships Study. 2007.)

Resources

(800) 799-7233

  • Love Is Respect national teen dating violence hotline (24/7) and chat line

(866) 331-9474 or text “loveis” to 22522

  • Casa Myrna’s SafeLink hotline in Massachusetts (24/7)

(877) 875-2020

Consent, sexual assault, and supporting survivors

(Episodes: 5, 7)

Statistics

 

  • Nationwide, 7.4% of students report having ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to. The prevalence was higher among female (11.3%) than male (3.5%) students.

  • Of those same students, 5.4% of heterosexual students vs. 21.9% of gay, lesbian and bisexual students report having ever been physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to.

(Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance – United States, 2017. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. June 15, 2018.)

 

  • Females ages 16-19 are 4 times more likely than the general population to be victims of rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault.

(Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Sex Offenses and Offenders. 1997.)

 

  • The one in five female public high school students in a MA study who reported ever experiencing physical or sexual violence from a dating partner were four to six times more likely than their non-abused peers to have been pregnant, and eight to  nine times more likely to have attempted suicide in the past year.

(Silverman J, Raj A, et al. Dating Violence Against Adolescent Girls and Associated Substance Use, Unhealthy Weight Control, Sexual Risk Behavior, Pregnancy, and Suicidality. JAMA. 2001.)

 

  • Of 201 Boston youth surveyed about dating violence, 71% said they had never sought services for a friend in an unhealthy/abusive relationship. They said that if they did reach out, they would feel more comfortable if the support was confidential and anonymous, respectful and non-judgmental, relatable and a good listener.

(Casa Myrna Vazquez and the Start Strong program of the Boston Public Health Commission. Survey of Boston youth. 2017.)

Resources

 

(800) 841-8371​

  • RAINN, National Sexual Assault Hotline (24/7) and chat line

(800) 656-HOPE (4673)

 

(617) 779-2179

  • Casa Myrna’s SafeLink hotline in Massachusetts (24/7)

(877) 875-2020

LEARN MORE ABOUT DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING

Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships (Start Strong) is a program of the Division of Violence Prevention aimed at working with young people as the solution to ending teen dating violence. Start Strong is an innovative grass-roots effort focused on 11 to 18 year olds to prevent teen dating violence and abuse by actively promoting healthy relationships.

Casa Myrna's SafeLink is a resource for anyone affected by domestic or dating violence. Are you worried about someone or have questions about abuse? Do you recognize warning signs of an unhealthy relationship? Do you need help or support? Call us. Each call is answered by a trained advocate who provides non-judgmental support, assistance with safety planning, and information on appropriate resources. Calls are free, anonymous and confidential.

Our mission is to end sexual violence. We empower survivors of sexual violence to heal and provide education and advocacy for social change to prevent sexual violence. 

loveisrespect’s purpose is to engage, educate and empower young people to prevent and end abusive relationships.

Break the Cycle inspires and supports young people 12 - 24 to build healthy relationships and create a culture without abuse. We are a culturally affirming organization that centers young people, caring adults, and communities in our prevention and intervention efforts. Our dynamic and diverse team believes that all young people deserve to live in a world where they can thrive.

RAINN is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization and leading authority on sexual violence. We are a dynamic organization comprised of experts in victim services, public education, public policy, consulting services, and technology. Our team works together to provide best-in-class services for survivors, inform and educate the nation about sexual violence, and improve the public policy and criminal justice response to sexual violence.

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